September is Save Your Photos Month

YOUR PHOTOS ARE ONE OF YOUR MOST CHERISHED POSSESSIONS.

Photos tell the stories of our lives.

However, in this chaotic, rapid and ever-changing digital landscape, our photos are scattered across multiple devices, in numerous boxes tucked in a closet and stored in outdated media. They’re disorganized, vulnerable, and in some cases, inaccessible.

Save Your Photos Month is the direct result of witnessing devastating losses many people experienced after natural disaster struck their communities. Wild fires, gas explosions, hurricanes, tornadoes, and other natural disasters are a constant in the daily news. Natural disasters or human error will always be a threat to your photo collection. We can help you safeguard your memories so you can prevent the loss of these irreplaceable treasures.

Follow the whole blog at Save your Photos  a professional photo organizer group.

Aaron Siskind once said,
“Photography is a way of feeling, loving, and touching.
What we have caught on film is captured forever.
It remembers little things long after we have forgotten everything.”

Also there is a very interesting blog,  DIY for using Photodex Pro Show video slide show maker.  Andrea Sims writes a comprehensive blog on how to organize, get started and execute your video slide show from photos. Read the rest of it here.

If video is not your favorite form of saving photos, try our September Make a Book class or Restoring your old photos or Learning Adobe Photoshop Elements . Nothing is more permanent for future generations than keeping and treasuring a book. cat-254572_1920.jpg

Tech Tips for the Summer

1. Are you  looking for new and easy ways to make your computing life stress free? Here are a few random tips that I found helpful.

Check out our August and September calendar for more classes and tips.

Techspot for all PC Tips and Tricks techtips

2. Did you know that Amazon has thousands of Kindle ebooks on photography, from beginner to advanced – and every level in between?

Many titles are absolutely free, and you won’t even need a Kindle device to enjoy them!

Click here to check out the awesome selection of free and low-cost photography ebooks at Amazon!photo tips

3. For whatever reason, the folks at Microsoft have decided that it’s a good idea to hide file extensions by default in recent versions of Windows, and Windows 10 is no exception.

You can easily force Windows 10 to display all file extensions from this point forward. Here’s how: 

1 – Press the Windows+E key combination to launch File Explorer.

2 – Select the View tab.

3 – Click Options (located at the top right-hand side of the window). The “Folder Options” dialog box should appear.

4 – Select the View tab.

5 – Uncheck the box beside Hide file extensions for known file types.

6 – Click Apply, then click Ok.

That’s all there is to it. From now on all of the filenames listed in File Explorer will include their file extensions.Windows-10-logo-300x154

Camera Cheat Sheet

Print this off and keep as a handy reference in your backpack or pocket. Watch for some out in field photo excursions in June and July. Info courtesy of Pic Monkey photography-cheat-sheet.jpg

Aperture

Aperture is all about light, numbers, and the sixth letter of the alphabet. Keeping track of how those things combine can be tricky, especially if you’re new to photography or haven’t had enough coffee. Take a look at the aperture section of this cheat sheet and determine which f stop suits your purpose.

Shutter speed

Is your shutter feeling the need, the need for speed? It better, if you’re after an outstanding action shot. But it should probably go slow if you’re looking for some beautimous motion blurring. To make sure you know just how fast or slow your shutter should go, we’ve included this handy shutter speed section on the cheat sheet.

ISO

Check out the ISO section of this cheat sheet to get an idea of the proper degree of light sensitivity for the setting. ISO settings range depending on the camera, but “normal” is said to be between 200 and 1,600. The lower the number, the less sensitive your camera’s sensor or film will be to light.

Exposure

If you’ve ever seen the exposure triangle, you know that exposure has to do with ISO, shutter speed, and aperture. On this cheat sheet, the exposure section is all about your light meter. Use it to remember whether that + or – in your display means your image will be over or underexposed, and adjust your shutter speed and aperture accordingly.